Ask Jeff

Got a reloading problem? Looking for a particular type of gun and need advice? Need to know the proper way to skin out a deer? Got nothing to do for a few minutes? You've come to the right place!

Just click the link below and ask your question. Keep your questions as brief (and clean!) as possible. We try to answer all questions in a timely manner, whether we use them or not, and we will post the questions here that we think will prove interesting to other readers. If you want your question published, please remember to follow some basic rules of English: try to spell correctly and use proper grammar, and please do not type either in all capital letters or all lower-case. Basically, the more time it takes to prepare your statements for publication, the less likely it will be that we will use them.

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Click this link to ask Jeff a question!

Jeff,

Gotta question about the 3 3/4 inch barrel bisley blackhawk 44 mag. Compared to the new model blackhawk with the same barrel length and caliber. To me they look the same. Are they? Can't seem to find the bisley edition so was looking at the new model edition. What are the differences and can the shooter put up with the new model during extended shooting sessions. Any advise would be great, Thanks.

Dave

January 5, 2014

 

The differences between the Bisley and the standard Blackhawk is the shape of the grip, trigger, and hammer. Mechanically, they are the same.

Jeff

Can you use .38-55 ammo in a Winchester Model 94 .375 big bore?

Trapper Bob

November 1, 2013

 

Yes I can. It works very well.

Jeff

Jeff, I have a 45 year old Savage/Anschutz 22 Mag. bolt action rifle. Do I need to make changes to the rifle to be able to use the 17 Cal. ammo?

Larry

October 25, 2013

 

Yes. It will need a new barrel.

Jeff

Jeff, what are several 380 caliber handguns that have safeties could you recommend ? Thanks.

Sid

October 25, 2013

 

All modern 380 semi-auto pistols have built-in internal safeties, but for pistols with manual safety levers, the Bersa Thunder is an excellent choice, as is the Ruger LC-380. Also, the Walther PPK is a good choice.

Jeff

No question, but regarding your recent gun retention training... 

I really admire how you didn't let pride interfere with your learning and further, you were willing to pass your learning experience along even though a lesser man might have been embarrassed to do so.

You give every indication of being a good fellow, Mr. Quinn. 

Best regards,

Lewis

August 2, 2013

 

Thank you, Sir. I can learn something from just about any trainer out there, as can most everyone, if they do not let their ego get in the way. I listen to every trainer, and while at his facility, I try to do exactly as he teaches. There is no "best" method that works for everyone, as some folks preach, but I think we can all benefit from doing a lot less talking, and a lot more listening, when it comes to honing our defensive fighting skills.

Jeff

Jeff, just recently purchased a Mossberg 695 12 ga. with ported barrel and looking at Marlin lever 45/70 guide gun with ported barrel. Just wondering your thoughts on ported barrels, to reduce muzzle jump and or lessen recoil? Using for hunting whitetail and possibly Adirondack black bear. Also are ported barrels louder than regular barrels? 

Thanks for your thoughts, 

Kevin

August 2, 2013

 

In 45-70, I cannot tell any difference in sound nor recoil, as that cartridge has a relatively low volume-to-diameter ratio. On a rifle with a high volume-to-bore size ratio, such as the Weatherby magnums and the 264 Winchester, a brake makes a lot of difference, but on the 45-70, I really cannot detect a difference.

Jeff

G'day mate,

Writing to you from Australia after a bit of help. Looking into buying a .223 for small and medium game hunting. I want a synthetic stock and a light rifle for lots of walking. I am looking at grabbing a savage axis in the youth model as I am a small person. What is your opinion on the quality, reliability and accuracy of these rifles? I have read reviews but getting mixed answers? Thanks very much for your help.

David

July 11, 2013

 

The Axis is an excellent choice. Lightweight, reliable, and accurate.

Jeff

What handgun would you say would be easiest for a left handed shooter to get used to?

Mike

July 11, 2013

 

There are many. All that is required is a LH safety on pistols that have a manual safety. The standard magazine release on most pistols works better for a lefthander than for a right-handed shooter. Press the mag release with your trigger finger. On revolver, a single action is ideal for a left-handed shooter, and a top-break like a Schofield is ambidextrous.

Jeff

Hi Jeff,

I'm looking for either a lever action or revolving cylinder rifle that will fire both a 410 shotgun shell and a 45/70 rifle round. It would seem that if one can be designed to fire the .45 long colt, the 45/70 should be doable?? Do you know if such an animal exists in any form? Magnum Research makes a 45/70 revolver and my guess is it might chamber a .410 but I'm not sure and besides I'd prefer a rifle. I think an over and under is made but I'd prefer a multi-shot.

Thanks 

Brian

July 11, 2013

 

That will not work. The case head is of much smaller diameter on the 410 compared to the 45-70.

Jeff

Dear Jeff,

I am a huge fan of the innovation and departures from typical design Kel-Tec has made in so many of their offerings. With that said, I have always heard that buying one of their weapons can be an all-or-nothing affair, as the ones that work seem to function flawlessly, but the ones with problems are total nightmares. However, I have also been told that when of the problem weapons surfaces, their Customer Service Department is exceptional and virtually always sends a new replacement weapon, rather than repairing the problem weapon. Most of this feedback has been regarding the P3AT, and the one I own has always performed flawlessly, so I don't know how much of this is urban legend only.

I am currently EXTREMELY interested in the KSG (for home defense and police duty use), and just read your review. The one criticism I have heard is that the selector switch to swap between mag tubes is lightweight polymer, and prone to breaking (perhaps it was the piece that blocks the tube not being used, not the switch itself?). I saw no mention of any concerns about this in your review, and just wanted to ask your opinion on this in a potential "hard use" police shotgun that will take a beating.

I am also very interested in the RFB because aside from being very handy and compact, I am a big Title II/Class-3 guy, and the reduced length of the bullpup design would be an excellent platform for my 30 cal suppressor. It works well on my Rem 700 and Rock River LAR-8, but the reduced overall length of the RFB seems like just the ticket! I have read your review of the RFB, but wanted to know if anything has come to your attention since that has altered your opinion of that weapon in any way?

Finally, I read the review of the PMR 30, and watched your YouTube video at the Kel-Tec plant. Any new impressions of that weapon, or any feedback that might be helpful regarding that weapon?

I realize that you are extremely busy and I have asked several questions. I apologize, but it seems that when my long-winded explanation is removed, the actual questions are fairly short. I trust all of you and respect your opinions very much. Any information you could provide would be most helpful and appreciated. As a single dad raising my son on a cop's salary, I obviously don't have a lot of disposable income. The combined purchase of all these weapons represents a fairly substantial investment for me, and before I take the full plunge, I would value any guidance you can give.

Thanks for the work all of you do to promote the shooting sports and provide helpful and honest reviews for fellow gun guys... and gals!

Thanks, stay safe, and God Bless, 

Lee

July 11, 2013

 

Kel-Tec makes some excellent weapons. The only problem is that they cannot make enough of them. As you noted, Kel-Tec customer service is among te best in the industry. The KSG is an excellent shotgun, and I have not heard of a breakage or failure of the magazine tube selector. I am not worried at all about mine. Likewise, the RFB is an excellent rifle. The PMR-30 is like nothing else on the market. I bought a second one just to have a spare. I did have a problem with mine. It appears that a cartridge detonated before being fully chambered, and damaged the slide. Kel-Tec replaced the slide, and turned it around within three days, all at no charge.

Jeff

I was wondering if maybe you could point me in the right direction on which revolver I should get? I'm looking for something that I can carry in the woods for protection here in middle Tn. The ones I'm looking at are, the Ruger Alaskan in 454 casull (mainly so I can hand-load hot 45 colt), sp101 in 357 mag, gp101 "Wiley Clapp", a vaquero or maybe even a uberti cattleman in either 45 colt or 357 mag.

Thanks for your time and God bless,

Matthew

July 10, 2013

 

Of those, my choice would be the 4.2 inch SP-101 357 magnum. It is lighter, handier, and powerful enough to handle anything that you might encounter.

Jeff

Will the Ruger Gunsite Scout Rifle accept larger magazines like the M-14 ones.

Skip

July 10, 2013

 

It will not accept M-14 magazines, but magazines of various capacities are available for the Scout.

Jeff

Do you happen to have a video or would you even be interested in doing a video about proper stance or hand placement to fire a semi auto, revolver?

Ryan

April 1, 2013

 

There is a lot of info about that, and various instructors have their own preferred stance. However, I tell people to do that which is comfortable for that individual person. We are all built differently, and what works well for one, does not necessarily work well for another.

Jeff

Hi Jeff. Really enjoy your videos, experience, and knowledge. Sorry for asking the following question if you have already addressed online but I'm wondering what handgun and ammo you personally carry for self-defense. Please don't feel obligated to answer this message during the Holidays. Merry Christmas to you.

Thanks,

Shawn

December 24, 2012

 

I always carry a pocket gun, usually a Ruger LCP 380, S&W 342PD 38 Special, or a Ruger LCR 38 Special. Right now, in my pocket is a small revolver, but I cannot tell anything about it yet. In addition, I sometimes carry a Colt Lightweight Commander 45 or a Glock 17.

Jeff

I recently acquired a new Ruger New Model Blackhawk Convertible, 45LC/45ACP, Bisley. Initial loads were tame factory 45ACP and 45LC. I'm new to SA and revolvers and love the gun. I'm not a hunter, just a range guy who enjoys shooting.

Recently began shooting Underwood 45LC +P 300 grain XTP JHP rated @ 1300 fps and I'm looking for advice on recoil management. I don't find the recoil from this load to be uncomfortable, but the muzzle rise and movement of the gun are significant compared to a stock 230 grain ACP.

In shooting heavier loads with significant muzzle rise and movement, what is the best strategy for managing that recoil? Fight the rise? Allow rotation @ the wrist? Any insight would be appreciated.

another Jeff

August 29, 2012

 

Relax and ride with the recoil. You want you arms to cushion, but not stop the recoil, much like shocks absorbers on a car. When you shoot, have your elbows slight bent. If you are stiff-armed, the wrists take all the beating. Hold the gun firmly, but relaxed, if that makes sense.

Jeff

Apropos of your excellent discussion following the Aurora shooting, what's your take on the NYPD putting down a shooter but hitting many innocent bystanders? Personally, I don't know how to draw a conclusion, but it certainly points out to all of us who carry concealed that unintended consequences can be an outcome of an armed confrontation. I understand that many policemen are not "gun guys" per se , but I hope they had the training and range time they needed prior to this incident.

Tom

August 28, 2012

 

I can't judge what they did, as i don't have all the facts. However, I do know that I am legally responsible for every bullet that leaves my gun, no excuses.

Jeff

Hi Jeff,

Our friend just opened up a small gun shop & gunsmith in north central Iowa, . He's knowledgeable, and particular about doing things the right way, and we really want his shop to be a success. What advice that you would give to him, as a new gun shop owner?

Thank you for your time, and for keeping up a great site. 

Erik

July 19, 2012

 

The most important thing is excellent service. He can't compete with Walmart on price, but he can build a loyal customer base by giving good service. A man buys a new pistol, throw in a box of cheap ammo, or a ball cap, or something to make the customer feel special. On the gunsmith side, deliver when promised. If you tell a man his gun will be ready on Friday, it better be ready, or the customer will be disappointed. If it is going to take a month, tell the customer up front. If it is going to take a year, tell the customer up front. If a man comes in looking for a particular gun, don't tell him that it is junk, just so you can sell him something off your shelf. Never make a woman customer feel like she is being talked-down to. If she wants a 22 for protection, sell it to her, even if you think it is too small. She will return later for a bigger gun, if she thinks she needs it. If your counter salesman is a commando wannabe, get another salesman. The customer does not want to hear how manly the counter salesman is because he carries a 900 Ultra Beast Magnum. If a man wants a 9mm, don't try to push him up to a 45. He will come back to you when he is ready for a 45. Honesty, great service, and a fair price will build a loyal customer base.

Jeff


Hey i have a 380 bersa and i wanna know with out Da clip in and i clock it back .does the triger pose to click...cuz it dont

Anna

July 15, 2012

 

It is not posed to do da click wid the clip outta da gun.

jeff

Hey Jeff keep up the great work, its really helpful! I'm just a weekend shooter and I was looking into getting a new rifle, I am torn on whether to get a Ruger American or Remington 700 calibered in .308. I haven't heard or saw many reviews on the American. I have also heard that the Remington's bolt is a little sticky. What is your opinion of the rifles smoothness and accuracy wise? 

AJ

July 7, 2012

 

I would buy the Ruger. The one that I reviewed was very accurate, smooth, and reliable. I also hear of the same experience from other shooters.

jeff

Jeff,

Thanks for all of your great information. I purchased a S&W 351PD magnum and, overall, I like the gun. It should be a great little carry gun. Have you ever reviewed it? If so, I was unable to locate it, could you direct me there? I am having an occasional problem with the ejector sticking (not returning to the seated position) and not completely ejecting the spent cartridges. Have you heard of this an if so, is there a fix for it? Anything you can tell me about the gun would be great.

Thanks,

Rick

July 7, 2012

 

Very good revolver. For the extraction, if the cases are sticking and hard to extract, try changing brands of ammo. That usually corrects the problem. Also, when ejecting, point the muzzle straight up. This helps the empty cases to fall clear of the cylinder, and also prevents burned powder residue from getting into the ejection system.

jeff

I had no luck clicking on "Ask Jeff" on your website. I just want know where I can get a bobtail Colt Commander 1911 (Light weight).

Thank you.

Mark Kilgore Gainesville, FL

July 4, 2012

 

Colt does not make one, but the S&W E Series is an excellent choice.

Jeff

I've been reading up on the 1911 in its various forms. Why does the 1911 use a link where the CZ-75 BD 9mm does not? What are the pros and cons of the link?

Opa in Oregon

June 29, 2012

 

The link was used by Browning in the 1911, and it works well, but the later designs of more modern pistols use a cam cut in the underlug. Both systems work well, but the link is easy to replace to tighten a loose-fitting pistol.

Jeff

Jeff are Hollow points worth the expense when using larger caliber guns? In my state u are response for every round. Most of your high end shot over penetrates. The impact of a 240gr shot would disable any 2 legged slime, if not send him to his final judgment.

Name Withheld

May 27, 2012

 

Yes, for all purposes except where the deepest penetration is needed, hollowpoint is better.

Jeff

Jeff,

I read your review of the Taurus TCP. I recently bought one and it is an amazing gun. I put 6 magazines of rounds into the head area of a target at 8 yards with no fliers. You have about the only review that has documented tests of Buffalo Bore ammo in this gun. Taurus goes into great detail about + p ammo but they do not specifically mention BB ammo as being too heavily loaded. Given your experience what is your opinion of BB ammo in this gun? This is such a good gun, I would think combined with bb hard ball ammo would be a near perfect carry load. 

Thanks

Lee

May 26, 2012

 

The Buffalo Bore is good stuff, and a limited amount will not harm your Taurus.

Jeff

Hi Jeff,

Once again I would like you to help me with a gun purchase decision. I respect your advice as I've asked for it before and you came through. I live in IL. Enough said. I'm going to carry regardless. It's called love of family. Now for the hard part. I've narrowed my search down to 3 guns. Maybe 4. Rohrbaugh R9s; Ruger LC9 with laser; Ruger LCP with laser and possibly a Ruger or Smith pocket revolver. Your thoughts, as always, much appreciated.

Thanks,

Wayne

April 28, 2011

 

Depends upon what is small enough and light enough to ALWAYS be with you. I have each of those guns, but my always gun is a Ruger LCP with a CT Lasergrip. Even if I am carrying a larger gun, the LCP is always there. If you can ALWAYS carry one of the larger guns, larger is always better, but it must be within reach at all times.

I carried illegally in Tennessee for many years. You do what you have to do.

Keep me posted.

Jeff

Hi Jeff,

I have an assortment of Guns, and Defensive weapons are my main focus, Pump shotguns, I have a Bushmaster AR-15, Glock 23 .40 cal. Here is my question, My favorite Gun of all is my Marlin 1894 .44 Mag Levergun. I would say I could more with that gun than anything else. Why do so few good articles and or books exist on Lever-actions for Home defense? From my experience I can put those 10 .44 Mag 300 Grain Hornady Hollowpoints on target almost as fast, and certainly more accurately than most people with an AR-15, and I might add the 300 Grain .44 mag Pill is a surefire Never Get up solution for 4 and 2 legged Predators. I figure the marlin 44 mag lever gun is the one Doomsday Gun you can do it all with. What are your thoughts Jeff?

Thank you for your time, 

Duane

March 18, 2012

 

Excellent choice! The levergun was once the state-of-the-art fighting rifle, and is as good today as it ever was.

Jeff

Hello Jeff,

I want my daughter and family to home defense themselves. When my son-in-law is not traveling absolutely no problem. The problem is when he travels and my daughter (5'5" tall and 105 lbs) is home alone with my grandson 16 months. I recommended a revolver, most dependable period. I suggested a .38 cal 2" barrel. She thought the recoil of the .38 specials SJHP was too much. Hence, I suggested using loaded down wad cutters thus keeping the bore size. She has not been an avid shooter since she was young and got mixed up with the sympathetic liberals and now realizes that our progeny needs protection. 

I am looking for your suggestion as the lighter weight women's revolvers, in my opinion, would defeat the recoil problem. Your suggestion is greatly appreciated. I love my Colt Detective special 2" barrel which I bought in 1992 after suffering stove-piping and slide problems with a .45 semi-auto. I use a customized bullet that has great stopping characteristics. I believe and practice in hitting what I shoot at.

Respectfully,

Bob

March 12, 2012

 

I had the same situation with my daughter. Her husband is in the 101st Airborne, and is gone away for months at a time. I suggest a Ruger LCR 22. The 22 is not a powerhouse, but penetrates as well or better than mild 38. It holds eight shots, and the recoil is mild, so she would be much more inclined to practice with it, and most importantly, she will be confident in her ability to hit with it. Have her practice at distances of about ten feet to thirty feet; realistic in-home distances. With that 22, which has a pretty easy trigger pull compared to many on the market, she could put a half-dozen CCI Velocitors into the attacker in a couple of seconds.

Jeff

Hey Jeff. Quick question and figured that u would know the answer. I bought the Ruger LC9 and took it to the range yesterday and was running some Speer lawman 9mm through it and noticed that the primer dents were not as pronounced as other auto pistols I have encountered. I checked online and other LC9 owners have experienced this and some have encountered no fire with some types of ammo. I think they were saying that federal and CCI ammo had tougher primers. What have u discovers with this? I didn't experience any no fires but the primer dents are not real deep. They aren't really light but they aren't as deep as other guns I have used. I use this as a backup so I want to make sure that the gun doesn't go "click " when I pull the trigger in a dire situation. Should I send back to Ruger for stronger spring? Should I just not worry about this? Should I just use ammo that works? Not sure what options are the best. I do know that the dents are about half dented as other autos that I have used, but I never have had a compact model like this before so maybe this is normal. Any advice would be helpful. Thanks. 

Dean

March 12, 2012

 

I would not worry about it. However, with ANY pistol that you are going to carry for serious purposes, ALWAYS run at least 200 rounds of the ammo that you intend to carry through the weapon before trusting your life to it.

Jeff


I have an AR15 with a registered DIAS and a 20" Shrike kit. I am looking to get an optic for the firearm, and want a holographic / red-dot sight. I need to have a sight with a large window. I need this because several factors make scope usage, in general, harder for me. I'd probably say that a 2"x2" size window or so would be great, give or take.

My question is this: I have no experience with optics (I'm a handgun guy), and as stated they are hard for me to use. All the EOTech sights seem to have the same 1.2"x. 85" window, and I couldn't find anything via Google about larger sights. Are there any Holographic sights with large windows? I don't really have a budget constraint, but all I seem to find are these micro-sights. If you could help me find some sights that fit my needs, I would be most appreciative.

Thanks in advance for your consideration Jeff. Always been a fan; keep up the good work.

-Daniel R.

February 24, 2012

 

The best on the market is the Trijicon Reflex. They make a small one and a large one. The window is not square, but is round. It works very well, and you leave both eyes open. It is always on, and never needs batteries. Very durable and rugged.

Jeff

Jeff;

I am an avid gun user and retired Police Officer who enjoys collecting the odd weapons. I ALWAYS watch your reviews when I have a question regarding the use of any firearm that I think that I would like to have. Your review sometimes steers me towards or away from that particular gun. For that I thank you. Very informative information.

Now I have seen in quite a few of your video posts that you are wearing shirts that say "Body Piercing By Ruger". Would you PLEASE tell me where you had purchased those shirts. I think they are GREAT!... and so does the wife. We would LOVE to purchase some of these if they are available for purchase ?.... Thank You Very Much.. and PLEASE keep posting.. Like I said before, your posts help me GREATLY!.... 

Vic in PA

February 12, 2012

 

The only place that I have found them, and I have both Colt and Ruger versions, is at the Wanenmacher Arms Shows in Tulsa, Oklahoma. There is a lady that has a booth there; her name is Janice, but she sells these nowhere else. I have tried to get her to open an online store, but she has not. Just twice per year at the gun show.

Jeff

Jeff,

First off I would like to offer my humble thank you for all the gun info and research you offer to amateurs like myself. People like you are the epitome of an American to look up to.

I am the proud new owner of a Ruger LCR .22lr it is a departure from my other handguns which are all autos 9mm, .32 and 10mm. Do you think this is a weapon that will hold up to repeated Range Use? It is my first .22 lr handgun and do not want to wear it out. My Glocks 26 and 20SF and also Kel Tec P32 and Kahr P9 seem robust, can I expect the same level of durability from it?

Also on a side note what is your opinion of the current options for president? I know this is a barrel of pickles to sift through but I highly value an opinion from a solid citizen like yourself.

Thank you for all you do for handgun and CCW supporters like myself and you are in my book a true patriot and good example to all Americans. Once again I am grateful for all you do.

Molon Labe.

Sincerely, 

Jeff

February 2, 2012

 

Shoot that LCR all you want. If it ever wears out, Ruger will fix it. 

For President, I am not overly excited about any of them. Ron Paul makes the most sense. I really like his thinking on most everything, but then occasionally, he will say something crazy, like it is okay for Iran to have nukes. However, on his domestic policy, he is right. Newt seems okay most of the time, but he is a big-government guy, and not likely to veto huge spending bills. Romney seems like a good man, but his record as governor is pro-abortion and anti-gun. I think Santorum is a good man, but it seems unlikely that he will last, and he is also in favor of the US policing the world. We just cannot afford all of this spending anymore. We need less government involvement. Most likely, Obama will win again, and if so, we are pretty much doomed as a free people. 

Jeff

Jeff! Love your website! How long can rounds be left in a magazine and chambered without being fired? Basically, do bullets have a shelf life? I have a Beretta that stays in my drawer locked and loaded at all times and I just realized that it had been three years since I've shot it (I do run some oil through it 2x year). Thanks!

Benjamin

February 2, 2012

 

Ammo can last for decades, but be careful to not let oil get on the primers, as it can kill the primer. If it is your defensive weapon, you need to be shooting it at least once per month, and by doing so, will always have fresh ammo in the weapon.

Jeff


Jeff,

I've surely read about half a dozen diverse ways to "break in a barrel" on a new, precision rifle. Some of the writers insist that not breaking it in can damage the accuracy; some go as far as to say that breaking it any way other than theirs will ruin it. Of course the devil's advocate to all of them says just go shoot it. I'd like to know if you recommend or practice any particular regimen for breaking in a new bore.

Ben

December 26, 2011

 

Just shoot it, keep it clean, and do not let it get too hot to touch.

Jeff

Jeff, 

Love your site and your gun reviews. Just re-read your review on the FN FNAR and had a question about it.

I know you're a lefty, like I am, and that's what I'm interested in. The FNAR (and a few other rifles and shotguns) comes with shims that allow you to add cast on/cast off to the stock. Lefties are supposed to have cast on as I understand it, so I was wondering if you tried the FNAR with the appropriate shim installed and if you noticed any difference. Or do you think the whole cast on/cast off thing is much ado about nothing?

I was going to buy an FNAR not long after they came out. I decided I really didn't much care for my ARs and especially didn't care for the .223/5.56. So I wanted a .308/7.62 battle rifle. Ended up buying a PTR-91, which is a fine rifle, but the FNAR is a much more accurate and easy to carry and shoot rifle. My PTR weighs close to 10 pounds, so it's a handful to carry around. But when you don't have a gas system to tame recoil, you either have to make the gun heavy or suffer from stiff recoil.

I still might buy an FNAR and keep the PTR.

Thanks.

mike

December 6, 2011

 

Cast is much more critical on a shotgun built for wing or clay target shooting, but a lot of that depends upon the individual shooter. With the FNAR, I would not even change it at all.

Jeff

Jeff, I have a 44 Ruger Super Blackhawk that I inherited from my father some years ago. It is serial #39XXX. It has a brass grip and trigger frame. It looks identical to the one you have pictured which you state is really rare (non-prefix), however in my research it states that these rare editions were only serial numbered within a certain serial number range up to like 36000 on the top end. I have definitely established that it was manufactured in 1968. Could it be a rare non prefix brass 44? I guess I don't know enough to know the difference. Could you please enlighten me?

Thank you,

Bob

November 27, 2011

 

The brass frame might have been added later. The best solution is to call Ruger Records department. They can tell you exactly the configuration of the revolver when it left the factory, and when it was shipped. If you request one, they will even send a factory letter stating that information. They charge nothing for this service. Call 603-865-2424.

Jeff


Jeff, we're counting on you to explain the whole "zombie" phenom as it applies to guns and ammunition. At least one major ammo maker and (according your NASGW Show reports) there are also gun manufacturers offering zombie products. Is this something we all need? How does zombie ammo differ from ammo that would be effective on game and uhh... other mammals?

It couldn't possibly be just a marketing ploy, could it?

Alan - Beaverton, Oregon

November 8, 2011

 

It is just marketing, and I do not understand it at all. If zombies were real, they are supposed to be dead already, so I do not know what good it would do to shoot one. It seems like childish stupidity to me.

Jeff

Jeff,

I had just read your review on the Savage Axis and felt it was a very thorough report on the rifle. I am buying my fiancÚ one of these rifles in a .243 and I wanted to properly break in the barrel. In your honest opinion what is the best way to properly break in a new rifle's barrel?

Thank you for your time,

Jon

October 27, 2011

 

An honest opinion is the only kind that I give.

I just shoot mine. No magic, no fuss. Lots of folks get too worked up over breaking in a barrel. It is a piece of steel, not a life-form of its own. For those who go through detailed rituals with a new barrel, that is okay, if it gets them through the night, but I have seen no benefit to doing so. Just do not let the barrel get too hot to touch, and clean it every 100 rounds or so.

Jeff

Hi Jeff,

My wife and I were shopping small self defense pistols and we were also intrigued by this Taurus. The only difficulty we were having is to return the slide into the firing position from being opened as it is after the last round is fired. It seems quite difficult to pull down the slide stop to let the slide go forward to the shooting position. Are we missing any tricks or methods?

thanks, 

John

October 15, 2011

 

Drop the magazine or insert a loaded mag. Then slightly retract the slide, and release it to go forward.

Jeff

Hi Jeff,

I just purchased a beautiful old model Ruger Blackhawk in .41 magnum. As I hand load myself, I was wondering if you have a preferred handload for this fine revolver?

Thanks, Jeff

October 15, 2011

 

I like to run the magnum revolvers at magnum velocities. Doing so, it is hard to beat a max load of H110 with any given bullet. For whitetail and such, a good 210 grain hollowpoint is a good choice.

Jeff

Hi Jeff, I was just reading the Charter Arms Pit Bull-Review and to be quite honest with you, one could think that America is something like a war-zone or at least a very dangerous place to live, especially when reading the fifth paragraph of the subject article. Being from Europe, I'm having a hard time to imagine that people are arming themselves due to - what sounds to be - a real threat to property and life. Is your area really that scary?

Thanks for all the great article and reviews, your page is a great place to read about guns!

Cheers, 

Dietmar

October 14, 2011

 

Where I live is not as bad as some, but even here, the threat is very real. I have used a weapon for defense myself, and so has my wife, when we were living near Miami, Florida. In our major cities, the threat is very real. Since more and more states in the US now allow legal concealed carry, violent crime is on the decline here. Because criminals know they might get shot by an armed citizen, violent crime is declining. It is getting better, precisely because more folks are arming themselves.

The report from the FBI below shows the decline. It does not, however, show the number of crimes deterred by armed citizens, as those many times go unreported.

Crime in the United States, by Volume and Rate per 100,000 Inhabitants, 
1991-2010 Crime in the United States, Percent Change in Volume and Rate per 100,000 Inhabitants for 2 years, 5 years, and 10 years

a.. In 2010, the estimated number of violent crime offenses was 1,246,248, a decrease of 6.0 percent from the 2009 estimate. b.. All violent crime offense estimates decreased in 2010 when compared with the 2009 estimates. Robberies dropped 10.0 percent; forcible rapes declined 5.0 percent; murders were down 4.2 percent; and aggravated assaults decreased 4.1 percent. c.. The 2010 violent crime rate was 403.6 per 100,000 inhabitants, a decrease of 6.5 percent when compared with the 2009 violent crime rate. d.. Violent crime rates for 2010 declined in all offense categories when compared with rates for 2009. e.. In 2010, the murder rate was 4.8 per 100,000 inhabitants, a 4.8 percent decrease when compared with the rate for the previous year. f.. The estimated number of property crimes in 2010 was 9,082,887, a 2.7 percent decrease from the 2009 estimate. g.. The 2010 property crime rate was 2,941.9 per 100,000, down 3.3 percent when compared with the 2009 rate. h.. The estimated number of motor vehicle thefts decreased 7.4 percent and larceny-theft and burglary decreased 2.4 percent and 2.0 percent, respectively.

Jeff

Hello Jeff, From the great state of Maine. I'm a newbie to the Shooting world. I just bought a Ruger SP101 and was wondering if you have any ideas about how to improve the sight visibility, either replace it with something like a Small Wonder Sight or simply dab a spot of fluorescent paint on the front sight. Any suggestion that you may have will be greatly appreciated. Thank you for the availability of your expertise. Keep up the great work and keep aiming true. 

Sincerely, hight357

October 8, 2011

 

You can try other front sights if you like. I really like the XS Big Dot for social work, but if you want to experiment a bit, fluorescent nail polish works great.

Jeff

Jeff,

I thoroughly enjoy your reviews and videos and have a few questions:

Is there a methodology that you use when constructing a gun review?

What points in a gun review do you consider important to the reader?

I have made several feeble attempts at gun reviews (for a forum that I belong to), but feel that my reviews do not flow as I would like them to.

Do you have any tips that you could pass along?

Best regards,

Daryl

July 30, 2011

 

I just try to cover every question that a reader might have. I list all the technical details, such as weight and physical size. Folks want to know the trigger pull, and of course, how accurate is the weapon for its intended purpose. Is it easy to carry? Balances well? If a defensive handgun, does it conceal well? Safety features? Just answer the questions that you would want answered if you were interested in such a weapon.

Be yourself. Be honest. If there is something about the firearm that you don't know, find out. If you can't find out the information, say so. "I don't know" is a good answer, if that is the honest answer.

Jeff

Hi Jeff how are you! I'm planning to buy a rimfire pistol Ruger Mark III Hunter VS Ruger Mark III Target, I just want to know which is the best gun for this two? I cant decide what to buy please help me thanks a lot.

Earl

July 20, 2011

 

Both are excellent weapons, and just depends upon your personal sighting preference. For paper punching, I prefer the target sights, but for hunting and casual plinking, the sights on the Hunter are probably better. I also love the fluted barrel on the Hunter.

Jeff

Hi Jeff.... Love your site and the information it provides. I recently purchased a Freedom Arms 475 Linebaugh and want your take on ammo for the piece. How does the Hornady perform in the weapon? The ammo is about half the price of the Buffalo Bore and I'm wondering if I'll be sacrificing performance in using it? If not, why the big pricing delta between brands? Also, an unrelated question, but is it a money-saving proposition to hand load for all calibers rather than buy factory ammo? I'm wondering if I should make the investment in a Dillon press and dies?

Thank you,

Bill

July 20, 2011

 

The Hornady is good ammo. If i was going after cape buffalo or a large bear, I would want tougher bullets, such as the Belt Mountain Punch or the Buffalo Bore heavy stuff, but for most game, the Hornady XTP is just fine.

You can handload high-quality ammo for less money than you can buy factory ammunition. However, overall, you probably will not save any money. You will just shoot a lot more.

Jeff

Jeff- Just bought a S&W 4" 29-10 and the factory grips are beautiful, but rough on recoil- what do you recommend? Great gun and fun but could be less abrasive on an old man's tender front paws. 

Thanks, 

Eric

April 10, 2011

 

I like the smooth walnut from Eagle Grips or the synthetic rubber from Hogue.

Jeff

What is the transfer bar safety on the super Blackhawk? How does it work and how long has Ruger been putting this on their revolvers?

Thanks,

Chuck

March 30, 2011

 

Ruger started using a transfer bar safety in 1971 on their double-action revolvers and in 1973 on their single-actions. It works very well, and prevents the hammer from contacting the firing pin, unless the trigger is pulled. The transfer bar rises to transfer the impact of the hammer to the firing pin, but moves away from that position if the trigger is released. This prevents the weapon from firing if dropped. 

Jeff

Re DPM systems - recoil reduction. Hi Jeff, my name is Marilyn. I grew up in Canada and currently reside in PA. I also recently found a new fun interesting world - "guns". We recently bought a S&W 9mm M&P which i am shooting not so well with. I am to the left (groupings) and slightly low. It is still a new gun (shot 3 outings) but I can tell this one isnt working with me. Maybe the trigger pull. I don't know enough about guns to know what is up. My husband shoots it not so good either but his are not left and low.

My question is: would this DPM system work for an M&P? Just wondering for future. Thanks for any help 

Marilyn

February 19, 2011

ps shoot kind of decent with some of our other guns - S&W 60 3" and 2-1/8" 357 (38sp shoot in it mostly) , S&W 63 5" 22LR and a Ruger Mark III hunter 6 7/8" (needed to file down mag button to help the magazines seat in properly as they were getting stuck at that button)

 

Yes, DPM has one for the M&P. Marilyn, I bet that you are right-handed, and are pulling the trigger with the knuckle joint of your finger. Try using the pad of your finger, and PRESSING the trigger to the rear. See if that helps your marksmanship. I believe that it will. Take your time, and concentrate on that sight picture. Speed will come later. Keep me posted.

Jeff

Jeff, Great site thanks a bunch. After reading your review of the GSG-5 rifle, I purchased and feel in love with one of my own. I've since bought an S&W M&P 15-22 Rifle as well. I've found them both to be excellent training tools and just a kick in the pants to shoot. I've taken them to hunting camp so the young shooters in the group could try them and they had a ball. I like the idea of the single point sling for these types of carbines but can't seem to find an attachment point that mounts behind the receiver for either of them. Are you aware of anything on the market for the GSG-5 and the M&P 15-22? Once again thanks for a great site. 

Dave

February 19, 2011

 

Excellent rifles. Brownell's has in stock what you need for a single-point attachment for an AR: http://www.brownells.com/.aspx/pid=31829/Product/AR_15_M16_A2_SINGLE_POINT_SLING_ADAPTER

Jeff

Jeff, Why is so hard to find any articles on the High Standard AR15? I own one an love it but no-one seems to know much about them.

Awj44jhn

February 19, 2011

 

I have done a review: http://www.gunblast.com/HighStandard-AR15.htm

However, unless High Standard pays a paper magazine by taking out a large expensive ad, most of them will never review the weapon.

Jeff

While reading your review I saw you mention the SR9c is a defensive pistol. Can you explain this further. What would not be considered a defensive pistol? This would be my first hand gun and after research I was leaning toward this gun... However, Id def like to understand more of the defensive and difference of a non defensive pistols available before I drop a lot of money.

thanks,

K. Y.

February 10, 2010

 

It is well-suited as a defensive pistol. There are no clear-cut guidelines, but some pistols are better-suited for self defense than others. For instance, a single-shot pistol would not be at the top of my list as a defensive weapon. Neither would a pistol that is too large to carry comfortably. The SR9c is easy to shoot, and easy to shoot well. The grip feels good to most hands, and the weapon is still easy to conceal in a good holster. It holds 11 rounds of 9mm ammo, and it is built in the USA. Excellent choice.

Jeff

Jeff, 

I refer to your articles regularly before purchasing a firearm. I like your perspective and sometimes humorous reviews and the fact you actually use the item before reviewing it. 

I recently bought a Smith & Wesson model 63, 3 inch barrel after your reading your reviews of smith & Wesson bringing back the "marvelous little big gun". I enjoyed shooting it and need to get "myself dialed in" to its shooting particulars. One thing that annoys me is that after about 60-70 rounds, maybe less, the ejector rod became very hard to eject the empty casings. This was to the point where I had to let the revolver cool down to work the ejection rod. It simply wouldn't budge and I had no desire to try and bump it on the wooden range table. Is this normal for a new revolver, is it the ammo, can it be fixed or do I need to carry one of the pocket cleaning kits in my range bag and scrub it out after it starts to bind up?

Thanks for your articles and your reply, 

Clayton J.

February 3, 2011

 

It is important to keep the chambers clean, and depending upon the ammo, this might have to be done every couple of dozen rounds. I have found that the good, high- velocity stuff like CCI Mini-Mags to go much farther between cleanings, and the cheaper ammo to need the chambers cleaned more often.

Jeff

Jeff:

Have you considered having a "shoot off" between the to sub compact 9mm pistols? I think it would be a very popular and intriguing comparison. A lot of people will also wonder will these pistols digest most brand of ammo and reloads. Running an IPSC / IDPA course geared for this little pistol would be outstanding.

In any event. I enjoy your reviews.

Kind regards,

Dale

January 11, 2011

 

I do not like to do shoot off type articles. In the end, I am expected to choose a winner, and that would be very arrogant and presumptuous of me. I cannot pick a weapon for another man any more than I could choose his wife or puppy for him. I prefer to review weapons one at a time, and let the reader choose for himself.

I am supposed to attend a course at Gunsite in early March where we will be shooting a variety of small 9mm pistols.

Jeff

Hi Jeff,

I am trying to choose between the 4.2 inch and 6 inch barrel Ruger GP-100, (.357 Mag) for White tail hunting. Is the 4.2 inch version capable of clean humane shots to about 75 yards or so accurately on whitetails. Or is the barrel length too short to retain enough energy at that range. Will the shorter barrel impact accuracy negatively? Revolvers are a relatively new field for me, if you have any better suggestions or choices they will be much appreciated..

Many Thanks,

Raja

December 11, 2010

 

The short barrel is just as accurate as the long barrel, and packs almost as much power. However, the longer sight radius of the longer barrel makes it easier for most people to shoot accurately.

Jeff

Hi Jeff, 

Your article on boar hunting came at the right time. So, I once again need your opinion. My cuz back in Texas has a small spread (400 acres) in need of some coyote and hog cleaning and said I'm welcomed there for that. While I have a Remington 700 VTR in 308 I'd rather use my Armalite M15A4CB for this job. Reading a lot about hog hunting and some forums based in Texas, the general view is to use something like 460 Weatherbys, I'm exaggerating a little, but almost everyone says 223/5.56 doesn't cut it with a 250 and greater hog. I would have thought your 9mm M&P wouldn't either... So, which would you use and what round would you recommend? (My M15 has a 1/9 twist.) Also of note, a Marine gunny friend of mine is tricking the M15 out with new trigger/bolt/grips and stock, along with an ACOG on top. (He's the owner of http://practical-defense.com/) Great having good friends.

Tom

November 27, 2010

 

The 223 is fine, but I would use the Cor-Bon load with the DPX bullet. My choice, however, would be my AR-15 with the 50 Beowulf upper. That thing is a real thumper!

Jeff

Good Evening Jeff,

Great site Mate, love your reviews on weapons and I never buy anything without first consulting your opinion. 

Mate I am wanting to buy my Wife a pistol for home defense. I seem to be away with work more often now and I would feel better as would she, knowing that she can protect herself if ever the unfortunate need arises. I have a 12 gauge pump as the home defense staple, but she is not confident or proficient in using it. Thus the need for a pistol, somewhat lightweight and something that she can reload and operate efficiently, but obviously with enough grunt. I have read on many websites, get a 9mm or a 40S&W but these are not female guns in my opinion. She cannot load either of these calibres, maybe people forget that there are other elements to shooting than simply pulling the trigger?

In your opinion what would be the best suited pistol in a semi auto for her?

Appreciate your advice always.

Regards,

Rob

November 9, 2010

 

A pistol that I have often recommended, for both men and women, is the Bersa Thunder 380. Loaded with good hollowpoint ammunition, it does a good job as a defensive weapon. It is easy to shoot, and fits small to medium hands very well. Recoil is very manageable, and the weapon is reliable and reasonably priced.

Jeff

I am a short range, woods hunter. I've never taken a shot at anything living past 100 yards and don't intend to start now. I have a Marlin 336 XLR in .30-30 that shoots Hornady 170 grain flat point into sub-M. O. A. groups. However, I found a 16" barreled version of my rifle. How much am I REALLY losing is I lose eight inches of barrel?

Stan

November 9, 2010

 

Nothing at all. Just stand 8 inches closer to the target! Seriously, you will lose a bit of velocity, but the deer will never know the difference.

Jeff

Jeff, I'm trying to build a sensible armory of firearms for hunting, home defense and emergency uses. I'm interested in simplified logistics, which means as few different calibers as possible.

Right now I have a 5.56 X 45 mm autoloading carbine, a little Marlin papoose carbine in .22LR, and a .30-'06 bolt-gun. My handguns are a .357 DA/SA revolver and a .22LR target pistol (Ruger MK III). Finally, I have a Mossberg 500 shotgun with an 18" and 28" cylinder bore barrels.

That's an awfully lot of different calibers. I don't need a huge ultra-high-power rifle, since elk are the largest critters where I live (no large bears). I'd like to minimize calibers, perhaps, by replacing my 5.56 carbine with a lever-action gun chambered in .357 Magnum to go with my revolver. That way, I'd have a handgun and a long gun pair in both .22LR and .38 Spl/.357Magnum.

I know this is kind of subjective, but I'd like to hear some inputs from people like you who have had a lot more experience than I with firearms. Do you feel, given what I've said, that I should modify/ subtract from / add to my existing armory?

Thanks for your help!

Duncan

November 3, 2010

 

You are asking the wrong guy! What you stated makes a lot of sense, but I have dozens of different calibers. You asking me that is like asking an alcoholic to help you stop drinking.

Jeff

Good Morning!

Since it's Sunday, you'll probably not get to this until after church service. I just wanted to let you know that on the "My Gunblast Store" page there is a typographical error. In the second or third sentence it says something to the effect of, 'We are constantly look for new PRODCUT to add ....' I just wanted to let you know about it. Your site has become one of my favorites to visit.

Ed in Memphis

October 17, 2010

 

Thanks for that information. I wish we did not have a store. We do not run it, nor make any money from it. It should not be there, but it is not entirely up to me. I will try to get this information to those who run the store.

Jeff


Jeff, I'm wanting to get a 45 Colt Ruger Bisley Vaquero Model 5129, KNVRB-455 2010 model. Is this model built the same as the older Bisleys, or is it only safe to shoot the light loads in the newer models?

Thanks,

Ron

October 11, 2010

 

The KNV tells you that it is a stainless New Vaquero, built on the smaller frame. You do not have to shoot light loads. It can handle plenty stout loads, just not the 45 Colt Magnum or Plus P like the Blackhawk and original Vaquero.

Jeff

Sir; I have an eye problem with scopes.. So My question is this:

Can I "drop in" my Ruger 10/22 barrelled action (including the sights) into a Charger stock?? Since I am going "the other way", that is, a long barrel pistol rather than a short rifle, I assume this would be legal.. And with the stability offered by the charger bipod plus the longer sight radius of the rifle, might make a very accurate piece.. I realize there are many options for increasing the accuracy of the 1022.. An answer plus any advice you care to offer w/be appreciated..

Dan

October 4, 2010

 

That will work. However, since your 10/22 was built originally as a rifle, it must keep at least a 26 inch overall length to be legal. Otherwise, you are making a "short- barreled rifle", as termed by the BATFE.

Jeff

Hi Jeff, I just want to ask for your advice regarding a Talon Wallet Holster that I recently bought for my Ruger LCP with Crimson Trace Laser installed. The problem is, I find it hard to pull the LCP out of the holster everytime I practice with it. I have tried putting the LCP in and out, in and out several times, I think I have done it about 50 times to break-in the new leather holster, but up to this time, it is still tight & hard for me to draw it fast. What can I do to loosen it? 

Jose

September 19, 2010

 

This happens a lot with new leather. What I do is soak the holster in silicone spray, and insert the gun, twisting it a bit, and then leaving the gun in the holster for a couple of days. This lightly stretches the leather, and makes it work much easier. Water will also work, but it rusts your gun, so I prefer the silicone spray. You can get the stuff at Wal-Mart in the camping gear section of sporting goods. It is sold as a waterproofing spray.

Jeff

Hey Jeff, 

First off I want too say that I am a huge fan,, when I need a review on a firearm your website is the first place I look, your always informative and too the point on what you test. My question is about the CrossBreed Super Tuck holster you tried with your M&P. I also carry OWB for everything but thought about trying a CrossBreed and your review seemed you liked it also. Now here is my problem...being a Good Ol' Boy from Kentucky I love my beans, cornbread, sweet tea and banana puddin' a little too much if you get my drift and slightly on the plump side. How do you reckon it would work for a hillbilly with a few extra pounds? I want something for my Glock 33. All of my holsters I currently own are from Simply Rugged and Rob suggested I go with his new Barracuda instead of the Silver Dollar Pancakes I normally purchase. What is your thought/honest opinion on this please? Do you ever use the CrossBreed any more? Thanks,

Mike

August 15, 2010

 

I have not tried that Barracuda, but Rob is built like you, and knows his stuff. Also, if you don't like it, he will replace it. While the Cross Breed is the most comfortable inside holster that I have tried, you will probably need looser pants and suspenders, if you have much of a belly. Also, depending upon if you wear your pants over or under the belly, the pistol might poke into your side meat when sitting.

Jeff

Hello,

I want to install a gun safe in my bedroom. I want it to meet the following criteria:
1. Can easily hold one large gun (e. g. a large frame revolver, a full-size semi-auto pistol, etc.).
2. Provides quick access (i. e. should not take more than a few seconds to open, even at night).
3. Cannot be easily breached or stolen by a burglar. (Some of those cable-locks look pretty vulnerable.)
4. Not horribly expensive (i. e. would be great if it was $100-200, no more than $300).
5. Is outfitted with foam so the gun is not scratched.
6. OPTIONAL: Would be great if it could do double-duty at home and on traveling (e. g. road trips).

There are so many from which to choose. What do you recommend?

Thanks!

David

August 11, 2010

 

There are several good brands on the market. I do not trust any of them for access to be quick enough when you are jolted from a deep sleep. A few seconds is way too long. Remember, you are asleep and expecting nothing. The intruder is wide awake, and has been planning his every move. You must have instant access to the weapon, and even then, you are at a disadvantage. A key is hard to find and operate quickly in the dark. The combination locks are time-consuming, and the biometric locks can also be fumbled. What I do is when going to bed, I open mine and situate the grip of the gun for easy access. When I get out of bed in the morning, I lock it up. Just get one that meets your needs and fits your weapon. The idea is to keep it away from children. A thief will just steal the whole thing.

Jeff

Several sources I have found on the internet comment on the how the ballistic properties of a 9mm Luger round fired from a carbine (e. g. the Hi-Point 995TS) are vastly superior to those from a pistol. What I can not find is information regarding how the 9mm Luger ballistic properties improve with increased barrel length. Such information would influence whether I buy a 9mm or .40 caliber pistol. I don't find it likely, or practical, to purchase a pistol with a barrel length greater than 5-inches. I am not interested in revolvers and the pistol I purchase would be for home defense.

Your thoughts?

- Peedee 

August 11, 2010

 

That principle applies to every cartridge. Some cartridges max out at about a 14 to 16 inch barrel, but others take 26 inches or more to reach full potential. Any handgun is a compromise. You must weigh ballistic performance with handiness and weight. Both the 9mm and the 40 benefit from a longer barrel. You must decide what you need from a pistol, and balance that with the need for portability.

Jeff

Jeff, What magazine loader do you recommend for the Thureon Defense 9mm magazines?

Thanks!

Doug

August 2, 2010

 

The LULA loader for the UZI is the best available.

Jeff

Hi Jeff,

Have enjoyed reading your reviews but I have a question RE: Reviews and Savage Rifles. From personal experience I have found that not all Savages are quite as accurate as reviewed. I read a review on the Model 14 in 308 that shot 1/2" groups and I bought one and shot the same ammo through it and it wouldn't shoot better than 1 1/2" with any ammo from sandbags and I'm a firearms instructor of 28 years. When I called Savage and asked them about the "very" average performance of the rifle a very curt woman told me that they don't guarantee any better than 1 1/2" groups from their sporting rifles. That's far from the tack drivers I routinely read about.

After having read your latest review of the Savage Edge that shot tiny groups. I have to ask would you consider buying one off of the shelf at Dick's or WalMart and review an off the shelf gun? I personally think Savage is sending out ringers for review purposes so that they only receive rave reviews. Why don't you give this a try so that the average Joe will have a real idea of what he is going to get when he lays down his hard earned $300.00 because for some guys that is what they can afford. I don't think that you'll find out that 1/2" groups will be the norm from the average off the shelf Savage. Would you consider trying an off the shelf Edge test in 243 Win to see if the average gun is as good as the one Savage provided to you? Being a cop, I smell a ringer. 

Bob 

July 22, 2010

 

I have often done that. Many of my Savage rifles have come through my local dealer, ordered from a wholesaler. However, guns are individuals. Using the same ammo used in another gun, you cannot always expect the same accuracy. You might try another brand that would do even better. That is why I always try as many brands as I can get my hands on. You have to experiment a bit. That is where handloaders have an advantage. Altering the powder charge or bullet seating depth slightly can make a dramatic change, and two rifles built on the same day will usually prefer different loads. Besides all this, there are also differences in scopes and mounts. Many times a rifle is blamed for lacking in accuracy, when a scope has a slight internal movement. It has happened to me often. I think that, although 1.5 inch accuracy is not bad, with a little experimenting, you can cut that in half with your rifle. Gather up a variety of quality ammunition, keep the bore clean, use a quality scope, and see what she will do. Keep me posted.

Jeff

Jeff - you've advised of the need to use holsters for certain pocket pistols (e. g., my Glock 26 - I certainly understand your warning), but have mentioned carrying certain "hammerless" revolvers in the pocket without the need for the holster. I'm a neophyte - please explain - is it because of the heavier pull on the revolver, or is there another reason?

Jeffrey

July 16, 2010

 

Yes, the long heavy pull on a revolver makes it much harder to accidentally discharge than the relatively light, short pull on a Glock 26.

Jeff

Hello, I read one of your articles about being ready for a disaster and having all of your gear ready to go. So I was wandering what your opinion be for a good backpack?

Isaac

June 20, 2010

 

I have not tried a backpack. I use a military LC-1 harness with a web belt. It holds a lot of stuff, but I think that a good backpack might be better.

Jeff

Hey Jeff,

My Name is Mike I was wondering what do you think about Obama and the second amendment. Do you think he will ban guns all together? Or will our gun founded nation stand up and fight against it? My right to bear arms I know will not go down without a fight! What about you? Hey and by the way I like your beard It give you and Old Texas Style look! Pretty cool! Thanks,

Mike

June 7, 2010

 

Obama has stated in public that he wants to ban all semi-auto weapons. He cannot do it without help from Congress, and right now, he has a lot of problems already. If re-elected, I think he will try to get the ban on semi-auto weapons.

Jeff

Dear Jeff,

I love your site, extremely informative, and though its tough to find a truly bad review from you guys, I've yet to find a gun that I hated shooting either. I do wonder sometimes at the politics that you allow to enter your writing. For the most part, I understand entirely, I'm a white male that is either extremely radically political, or middle of the road, it depends on who you ask. My primary question for you is fairly subtle. You make no bones about your lack of support for a national "choice" option for health care, yet are a Christian man. Do you really believe that Jesus would have let Blue Cross explain why the five thousand couldn't be fed? We are, by and large a Christian nation, and I think that's a good thing, yet, we are the last industrialized nation not to offer a national health care choice. Do you believe those ideals are commensurate with one another? I don't remember Jesus doing a credit check before giving to the poor. 

Either way, great site, keep the articles coming, and a review of the new Nikon scope system would be awesome.

Aric

May 27, 2010

 

I am not sure what Jesus would do. Many in our culture confuse health care with health care insurance. No one has to buy health care insurance (although they will under the new law). It is the insurance that Blue Cross sells, not health care. I am free to pay my doctor for his/her services out of my own pocket. Folks pay companies like Blue Cross to assume the financial risk for them, just as we pay companies like Allstate to assume the financial risk of having an auto accident. Many in our culture feel "entitled" to other people's money, that we should take from those who work to pay for things for those who do not. I think that Jesus would be pleased if I took my money and gave it to some poor family, but how does it please our Lord for the government to steal my money and give it to some poor family? God has the power to give as much as He wants to whomever He wants. Jesus said: "The poor you have with you always". If I steal from Bill Gates to buy something that I want, that is a crime, but if the government steals it for me, that is called compassion. The government is us, all of us. If it is not right for me to steal, it is not right for us to steal. I live in a country where I am free to work and earn money to buy what I need and want. So are you. If you choose to spend your money on a bigger house than mine, or a better car, then why should I have to buy your health insurance? If I choose to spend all of my money on guns, why should I demand that the government steal your money to buy health insurance for me? How about this idea: Each free man and woman works for their money, and spends it as they choose? As you stated, there are many places in which to live that the government will tax you heavily, and then provide you with "free" government health care. Why screw up the best health care system in the world, just to be like everyone else? Health care here is expensive, because it is what we want. If our leg itches, we want someone to look inside with a multi-million dollar machine, but to not charge us for the service. We want drug companies to spend billions of dollars and years of research to make us the latest feel-good drug, but then call them evil for wanting to make a profit on that huge investment. We want the evil oil companies to spend millions of dollars every day to provide us a reliable source of power for our cars, but scream loudly that they make nine cents per gallon on gas, then say nothing about our government making 42 cents on that same gallon of gas, without ever lifting a finger nor investing a penny. They reach and take a larger share, but we curse the man who makes the product for us. Be patient, Sir. We are quickly becoming just like all the other nations on Earth. We are more socialized every day. Personally, I think that Jesus must be both hurt and disgusted at us. We steal from our brethren, kill our babies, and pay subsidies for slothfulness and unwed reproduction. We pay people to not work. The major source of income for women in our inner cities is a check paid for each fatherless child. We pay farmers to not grow food. We pay women to murder their unborn children. We spend more on dog food than on feeding our neighbors. Then, when a man or a company tries to make a product and turn a profit, we demand that his product be given to us for free, for that is our right. I appreciate your comments, and really do not know what Jesus would do. There is an excellent chance that you are right and I am wrong. Thankfully, Jesus does not ask my opinion, nor condemn me for my faults. His grace is beyond understanding, and His forgiveness of the things which Man does to his fellow-man is never-ending. 

Jeff

Jeff..... I note in your recent posting that Rossi will now offer a very reasonably priced, .45 colt Mare's Leg, built on the 1892 model.

Because the Mare's Legs on the market were all in the $1.200.00 range, I bought a Rossi Model R92-57006, in .45 Colt, a few months ago, for about $500. I'm very happy with the gun. My question... if I found a gun smith to cut off the stock to the length of a Mare's Leg, would it be legal? Will the stock withstand being cut off? Thanks.

Chuck

May 26, 2010

 

It will violate the NFA of 1934, and can get you five years in a Federal prison. Don't do it.

Jeff

Hi Jeff, I am having a tough time trying to make a decision on getting a Ruger P90 or the P345, if you have any experience with these two guns what's your opinion on them, and how do they compare.

Mike

May 26, 2010

 

Both are excellent weapons. If carrying concealed, the P345 is more compact and lighter weight. The P90 is an excellent 45, one of the strongest available, but it is pretty bulky for concealed carry.

Jeff

Some forums say the Glock 36 is a "Girl Gun" What do you say to that? I disagree as it's nowhere near the "girl gun" a LCP is but millions of MEN carry that(including me).

What's your opinion on the Glock 39? It's the same size as the 26,27, and 33. Which is smaller than the 30 and 36. And has .45 power, but only 6 rounds. I'd really like one of each pocket Glock but that would cost too much. I want something concealable but would stop the "bad guy" in one shot.

Mark

May 26, 2010

 

There is no such thing as a girl gun. That is just BS spouted by armchair commandos who want to appear to be more masculine. Shoot and carry what you want.

There is no handgun that can be concealed and guarantee a one-shot stop. The 39 is a good weapon, but the future looks dim for the 45 GAP cartridge. My choice of those three would be the 26, loaded with Cor-Bon DPX ammo.

Jeff

Your thoughts on what you feel is a good CCW for a female? Thanks for your input.

Elaine

May 3, 2010

 

Same as for a male. It must first of all be small enough and light enough that it will ALWAYS be with you. A 45 is nice, but if you can't reach it, it is of no use to you. Something that seems to work well for everyone is a small, lightweight 38 Special revolver, like a S&W 642, a Charter Undercover, or a Ruger LCR. Whatever you get, make sure it is what YOU want. Do not be intimidated by some gun store commando who knows everything. Any handgun is a compromise. If you know you are heading for a fight, carry a 12 gauge shotgun. The handgun is what we carry because it is convenient. We can have it with us as we go about our daily lives. Get what is comfortable for you, practice with it, keep it within reach, and keep me posted on your progress.

Jeff

Hi Jeff,

I really enjoy your website. Lots of terrific information. I know you're busy so I won't take much of your time and my question is this. I was given two boxes of CorBon ammunition in 40 S&W. It's the 135 grain cartridge and my question to you: is this round too light? I know the muzzle velocity and energy are pretty high, but I wonder and worry about getting enough penetration. My concealed carry gun is a SIG P229 with a 3.9 inch barrel. According to SIG anyway. I realize you probably don't like to give advice on what cartridge or bullet weight to carry, but I truly would appreciate your input. 

Thank you for your time, and have a terrific day.

Best wishes, 

Michael

March 14, 2010

 

That ammo is an excellent choice for self defense.

Jeff

Hello Jeff, I am looking for a new or used revolver. Biggest stumbling block in choosing is caliber choice. I am looking at .357 and .44 Rem mag as options. I currently carry a Glock 22 and 27 as weapons for work and personal carry but this will be my first revolver to own. I have shot numerous other revolvers: .22LR, .38, .357 and a 44mag Redhawk. The purpose of the revolver is for hiking and hunting and the locale for my expeditions is Wyoming. I am looking for a revolver with a 3-6" barrel for the lighter weight paired with more accuracy than a stub nose offers. Also, this gun will be carried in cold weather and I will likely wear gloves while carrying it so the small framed guns are inappropriate choices. I have looked at the SW 327PD in .357 and like the fit and capacity of 8 rounds. I also like the SW 629 Classic in 44mag. but am unsure if I really need to sacrifice the capacity for a larger capacity. A .25 inch hole where you want it, is going to be better than a half inch hole over a bears shoulder... I am a fan of Speer Gold Dot hollowpoints and will likely use them as my primary ammo. Is there a need for the larger caliber, or will .357 suffice? I imagine the maximum ranger I will need the gun is at 50 yards. Oh yeah, I am young, fit, 5'11", 170 pounds, and have XL hands, so the large revolvers aren't a problem for fit. What caliber do you recommend, and what model or make?

Thank you,

Jeremy

March 10, 2010

 

There are many good choices available, and the .357 will do most anything that needs doing with a revolver. However, for a large bear, the .44 is better. The S&W Mountain Gun is just about ideal for what you need. If large bears will be in the area, I would carry it loaded with some good hard cast or tough jacketed bullets. Even the Belt Mountain Punch Bullet would be very useful, and guarantee the deepest penetration. You can buy the Punch factory loaded by Grizzly Cartridge Company.

Jeff

I carry a concealed pistol in an inside-the-waistband holster just to the right of my belt buckle, with my shirttail out and covering it. Small .380s, a Rohrbaugh 9mm, and a S & W Model 36 w/ 3" barrel work fine in this manner. I am interested in a Kimber .45 ACP Ultra Carry II. Do you believe this little 1911-style .45 would be too big for this type of carry? 

Thanks much, 

Gary

February 19, 2010

 

Depends upon your body. It seems to me that sitting down would be a problem. Also, I would not want a .45 pointing in the direction of my wedding tackle. Hurts to even think about it.

Jeff

Jeff, I noticed your advice to a guy wanting to arm his gal -- find a gun that she's pleased with and can handle -- and just wanted to add my two cents.

I'll turn 60 this year and my wife and I will celebrate our 31st anniversary. I've taken her shooting many times, outings she's enjoyed, but she's a machine-hostile person who has issues even with can openers and is quite uncomfortable handling firearms alone, forgetting even the basics of safe handling. Did I mention that she's a teacher? 

While I love her dearly, she does not have a firearm, but does have some pepper spray, although I leave the room whenever I see her move that canister from one purse to another. Her relative defenseless situation concerns me because I do spend much of my time out-of-state, but, fortunately, my daughter and son did not inherit this gene and are capable, competent, and prepared when it comes to home and personal defense. 

For about a decade I've been a gun-booster; I encourage folks to take up shooting by giving a basic gun-handling lesson in conjunction with trips to the local NRA range. It's a great range because one must pass a written test before shooting there for the first time, and the range personnel are first-rate: attentive and pro-active. 

I've been successful: of the 20 co-workers I've taken shooting, all but one have gone on to purchase their own firearms, and three females have gone on to get their CWPs. 

What I've learned is that handgun choice is quite personal. When I take folks to the range, I bring along a .40 S&W semiautomatic pistol, .38 Spl snubby, a .357 revolver with 4" barrel, and a Bushmaster 5.56 carbine for variety. The gals generally are not big fans of the pistol and carbine, they complain about the auto ejection. Two who went on to get CWPs ended up with S&W .38 Spl concealed hammer snubbies in black (despite Charter Arms and Taurus marketers offering a range of shades, both independently said that "black goes with everything") with Crimson Trace and trigger jobs. 

But the hoot was the one co-worker, a mid-fifties big gal, daughter of cop who'd previously only fired long guns. She liked the heft of the .357 quite a bit more than the concealability of the .38 snubby two years ago when I first took her shooting. So when I got my Taurus Judge (blued with 3" cylinder and 3" barrel) last summer, I took her to the range one Friday at lunchtime to try it out. (The NRA range allows only .45 LC, not shot shells). She loved it so much she called around and bought one the next day (at Loudon Guns, in Leesburg, VA), a Saturday. She encountered a bit of resistance from the sales guy who asked, for good reason, I suppose, if she was sure that was what she really wanted. Her response was such that he promptly got the gun, the case, and a variety of ammunition along with cleaning supplies faster than, as you might say, a Bud disappears at a biker rally. Soon after she got her CWP and has become a member of a range near her home. 

The Lord moves in mysterious ways, no? 

One final point: while I consider the .38 Spl the smallest round capable of doing the job with one shot, I do find that my S&W Airweight snubby with Crimson Trace grip a bit too large to carry under some circumstances and am considering a semiauto .380 ACP. I have tried a friend's Ruger LCP and do like it except, for some strange reason, in my hands the magazine pops out after two or three rapid shots, even after trying several variations in holding the durn thing while someone else watches what I'm doing. (I consumed a precious 50-round box in trying to avoid this problem.) Somehow I'm hitting the magazine release. So I'm still looking... 

I thoroughly enjoy your well-reasoned opinions, perceptive reviews, and perspicacious outlook on life. May you continue to enlighten and enrage for many decades more! 

Mike - Columbia, SC

January 23, 2010

 

Thanks for that insightful feedback. I have trimmed down the height (the amount of protrusion) of the mag release on my LCP and my Kel-Tecs for that reason, leaving just enough of a "bump" to drop the magazine when I deliberately want to do so. I never had the problem of releasing during shooting, but sometimes the mag would be released in my pocket, when I bumped up against something.

Jeff

I have looked at the Judge 410/45 for my wife for protection in the house but I think it is to big for her to handle do you think it is. I saw A small 3 shot revolver would you know what that might be and would that be better for her?

Randy

January 9, 2010

 

Not knowing your wife, that is hard to say. Keep in mind that a larger, heavier handgun has less felt recoil. Take her to a gun store and let her handle a few, to find the gun with which SHE is the most comfortable. It needs to have adequate power, and be something in which she has total confidence. The Judge is a good choice, properly loaded, but if she prefers an all-steel .38 or .357, that will also be a good choice. 

Jeff

I am a father of five kids and am getting back into fire arms and hunting because some of my children are showing an interest (the girls, not the two older boys). I have always used hand loads when I use to shoot and have recently been reading postings alluding to legal liability in regard to using hand loads. What do they mean specifically? To me it is as important to teach a kid to make their own hand loads as to hunt or shoot.

Billy in PA 

January 8, 2010

 

I handload just about everything that I shoot. I would not worry about the legal liability. That opinion is voiced by some, in the event that you have to shoot a person in defense, that a jury could be talked into believing that you assembled some ammo with "extra killing power".

Jeff



I have an XD45 and read your page before I purchased. It fires all the 230 gr. I have tried, but I have had no luck with Laser Cast 200 gr. LSWC. I have double checked that I am not crimping the loads, and the seating depth is correct. 

When firing this bullet, I have experienced "stove piping"; failure of the slide to go all the way forward to where I need to hit the back of the slide with my palm to be able to fire. I have even experienced the case not being extracted from the chamber.

My local gun dealer says because of the design of the barrel tipping up on extraction then the follow on round will catch the shoulder on the previous round. 

You stated in your article that the most accurate load was your hand load using the 200 gr LSWC. 

Do you have any suggestions? I figure I will just fire 230 gr round nose or factory loads. 

Thanks for your time. 

Mark

December 28, 2009

 

Yes. I learned this many, many years ago. You need a taper crimp die, done in a separate step after bullet seating. Not a Lee "factory crimp", not a roll crimp, a genuine taper crimp die. It will fix the problem of the slide not going completely into battery. It will fix the problem of the empty case catching on the next cartridge in the magazine. I had these same problems. The taper crimp die is the answer.

Jeff



I am new to your forum.

I have recently acquired a very basic, inexpensive Winchester .22 single shot rifle the Model 67A. I know its not normally the type of arm your Q/A focus on but I'd appreciate the advice. The gun is 100% original from what I can tell, the metal is all in good shape but the bluing on the barrel/action is about 70%. It's all more brown than blue. No scratches, no rust, bright shiny bore. Trigger guard, fore-stock screw and "bolt" cocking device are about 98% blue. The stock is 100% and is actually an interestingly figured stock for the quality/model of gun. Nicer than I've ever seen on a 67 which is why I bought it. I paid slightly less than it's worth in today's market, and I didn't have one in my collection yet. My question is, given the uniqueness of the stock and overall condition of the gun, is it worthwhile to have the barrel re-blued by a professional using a method/color period-correct for Winchester, which would make the gun look perfect or would you suggest I keep it 100% original. Having a nice example of this model for my collection is more important to me than having a shooter, and I don't want to put more $$ in it than it's worth. Finding a perfect 67 single shot in 100% is difficult, and those I have seen are going for about $200 more than what I have into this one.

Thanks

Jay

November 9, 2009

 

If it was mine, I would put the money into ammunition to run down that perfect bore, and leave the exterior as is. I like a gun with a little character.

Jeff

On the review of the LG-431 laser sight for the Ruger LCP, you show a leather pocket holster from Simply Rugged. I went to that site and they show a holster for the LCP, but do not give any information about different sizes that will fir the LCP with the laser sight installed.

Can you please tell me the model number of the holster shown in the picture so I can order one?

Ross

November 8, 2009

 

There is no model number for it, but email or call, and tell them that you want one for the LCP with laser, just like they built for me. Rob Leahy builds each one by hand, and can make anything that you need.

Jeff

Hello Boge,

I recently purchased a Walther PPS 40 and I'm wanting to purchase an IWB holster for it. You're built about like me judging from your website. I'm 6'5" & 300lbs. What is your favorite IWB holster for a small semi-auto like the Walther?

Soli Deo Gloria,

John

October 28, 2009

 

John,

I rarely use IWB holsters myself, as there's too much of me already in there and I don't have room for a weapon (GRIN). I like a Simply Rugged pancake, which can be purchased with "inside-out" straps as shown in the article that allow the holster to be used as an IWB holster. The Simply Rugged holster can even be used with their "Chesty Puller" chest holster, as shown here. A VERY versatile rig, and an excellent value for the dollar. Plus Rob Leahy, owner of Simply Rugged, is a good guy.

Jeff also likes the Cross Breed SuperTuck IWB holster. It looks like a comfortable and stable rig, but I haven't tried it myself.

Boge

At the request of readers who have noted that the Ask Jeff page has become very slow to load due to the number of questions on it, we have archived our older Q&A. We thought this a better alternative to deleting them entirely; this way, all the Q&A we have posted will remain on the site and available for reading.

You may access the older comments on the Ask Jeff Archive page.

Boge Quinn - Webmaster

NOTE: All answers posted on this web site are for educational purposes only. Neither the author nor GunBlast.com assume any responsibility for its use or misuse. 

Any loading data indicated were arrived at using specialized equipment under conditions not necessarily comparable to those encountered by the potential user of this data.  Always use data from respected loading manuals and begin working up loads at least 10% below the loads indicated in the source manual.